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Home Latest blog Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine is one of rare and beautiful cars in the world
Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine is one of rare and beautiful cars in the world

Bugatti Type 57

by Peter Barnes

The Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine is a mystery. It is thought that Ettore Bugatti’s son, Jean Bugatti, made the car, even though “Usine” was never an official Bugatti nameplate.

The chassis that supports the body of the Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine was one of the ten Bugatti “Grand Raid” chassis that the company designed and built before World War II.

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine History

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine
Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine

After being shown for the first time at the Salon de l’Automobile in 1934, the Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Usine took part in the Paris-Nice rally.

At the time, the famous racer Pierre Veyron was driving, and Bugatti paid him a great tribute by naming the most famous supercar of the 21st century after him.

Robert Benoist, a Grand Prix driver, drove the Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine to victory in the Chavigny hill climb competition in 1935.

Hey Usine… Where were you..?

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine
Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine

Bugatti sold this vehicle to its original owner after the Second World War, who changed the headlamps on the front fenders to give it a new appearance. But eventually, Bugatti was able to keep the vehicle, and it was then rebuilt in accordance with its original specifications.

This Bugatti Type 57 Roadster was restored and placed on exhibit at the Louwman Museum in The Hague in 2001. Since then, the car has become a popular display at the museum, which draws attention to how well it was made.


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For lovers of vintage cars, The Hague’s Louwman Museum, where the Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine is on exhibit, is paradise. The Louwman family of the Netherlands created the museum in 1934.

More than 275 vintage cars from over the last 130 years are kept there. Evert Louwman, son of the founding Pieter Louwman, owns today’s museum. This museum on The Hague’s Leidsestraatweg was designed by Driehaus Prize-winning architect Michael Graves.

Bugatti! With its renowned turbocharged W16 engine

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine
Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine

Bugatti is making headlines for retiring its venerable W16 engine in the aftermath of embracing an electric future. The new Bugatti Mistral will be the last car to have this powerful engine, which is without a doubt the most powerful engine ever put in a supercar.

Beyond the confines of the present and the future’s impending trip, however, Bugatti has a storied history of producing legendary roadsters. Bugatti is known for making beautiful, one-of-a-kind cars, and these cars from the past have helped them get where they are now.


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The Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Usine is one such vehicle. It was recently showcased by the French automaker in an immaculately repaired state and is currently on exhibit at the Louwman Museum in The Hague.

The Bugatti Type 57 Roadster, in the opinion of Christophe Piochon, President of Bugatti Automobiles, is a wonderful example of a high-end sports automobile that honors Bugatti’s illustrious past.

He continued by saying that cars like these paved the way for the contemporary Bugattis of the twenty-first century and elevated the brand to the heights of craftsmanship and luxury. In the more than a century-long history of Bugatti, this is the first time the “Usine” suffix has been applied to a model.

The Single Most Exclusive Work of Art Currently in Existence

Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine
Bugatti Type 57 Roadster

The Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Usine that we are discussing is the sole Type 57 known to exist. At the Salon de l’Automobile (now known as Mondial de l’Automobile) in Paris in October 1934, this open-top Type 57 roadster made its triumphant debut. This car is thought to have been personally created by Jean Bugatti, the son of Bugatti founder Ettore Bugatti.

One of the numerous Type 57 body styles that are known to exist is the “Grand Raid” model, which is the example that Bugatti is showcasing. By using the word “raid,” Bugatti announced to the world that this vehicle was made for participation in grueling racing rallies. Only 10 “Grand Raid” chassis were produced by Bugatti, and this Type 57 Roadster Usine is one of them, adding to its exclusivity.

More Information About The Bugatti Type 7 Roadster Grand Raid

The Bugatti Type 57 is already a rare vehicle, making the Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid Usine an even greater rarity. This car’s aluminum body is painted in a dual-tone theme of Ettore Bugatti’s preferred colors, black and yellow. This vehicle, chassis number 57222, has been meticulously restored, displaying exceptional attention to detail.

The front hood of the Bugatti Type 57 Roadster Usine is tapered and conceals an inline-8 engine with a displacement of 3.2 liters (198 cubic inches). This engine gives the vehicle a top speed of 95 mph with a maximum power output of 135 horsepower. The front fenders of this car have swooping curves, while the tail end is sleek with curved bulges covering the back wheels.

The car also features a horseshoe-shaped grille with a square bottom, a design feature that Bugatti has continued to use in its more recent models. The Type 57 Roadster Grand Raid also features an aerodynamic headrest support and a V-shaped windscreen. High-quality walnut brown leather covers the interior, giving it an opulent appearance.

Bugatti 57 Roadster photo gallery


Source: Bugatti | All the information & photo credit goes to respective authority. DM for removal please.


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